Outside-in — To the max! (BDD and Microservices part 2)

This is part 2 in a series about my 20% project BDD across team bordersPart 1 can be found here.  

When writing any piece of software, it’s very easy to start working on the details before you have enough knowledge about the targeted context. I think most developers recognize this pattern:
You start with some innocent (often unintentional) guessing about one or a few unknowns. Pretty soon the guesses turn into assumptions and before you know it they have morphed into ‘truths’. You happily code away with these truths as your guiding light. Later, when you try to integrate your code into a bigger context, the assumptions and truths fall apart and you need to rethink your work.

– Oh, is that how the incoming data looks like!
– Why didn’t anybody tell me I have to ask the database for that value?


Personally, I have made these kinds of mistakes countless of times, and I will probably make many similar ones in the future. I think this is due to human nature; We really like making assumptions for some reason. To minimize the impact of this phenomenon, we have to try really hard to be aware of it at all times. We also have to find strategies and techniques that help us avoid making these false assumptions.

spiralTest Driven Development (TDD) is one excellent tool for this purpose. It forces us to step outside of the current context and look at the problem from the outside, or from “one level above” if you wish. More importantly, the TDD approach fits on all levels of software development! No matter if your context is a oneliner method in a class or the public API of a complete service, you always benefit from taking one symbolic step out of your current context.

In my 20% project BDD across team borders, I wanted to take this line of thinking to the extreme, and work on the highest level possible, thus making sure I was taking the “outside-in” approach to the max, maximizing our helicopter view in the process.
I set as a constraint on my work going forward that I was only allowed to write the BDD tests against our publicly available APIs and web pages. No matter how tempting, I would not “cheat” by calling internal APIs or access anything not available to a user in production. If I did, I would risk getting my assumptions wrong, as described above.

Working against public APIs also provides another great bonus;  It forces you to write user-centric stories that are sliced vertically. A good rule is that “Every story must have a noticable effect on the public API level”. If you write a story that has no noticable effect for any user, you have not succeeded in writing a vertical story.

My claim to test on the “highest possible level” is not entirely true, of course. There will always be third party dependencies and other integration points that we cannot incorporate in the system under test. We will have to fake or mock things like partner APIs, for instance. As long as we don’t mock or fake our own code or apps, we should be good to go!

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